things I giggle about, love and enjoy.

1st October 2014

Post

the more knowledge I accumulate about Vikings and their myths, the more the Marvel/MCU depiction of Loki as having dark hair becomes both the best and the worst.

the best because the Loki of myth I think would’ve had black/dark hair. before he bleached it with lye soap to bleach it to fit in. and what does black hair turn into if you don’t use strong enough bleach/only bleach it once? orange/flame red, exactly like the myth says
(and I get the worst case of giggle over this, because Marvel make Tom Hiddleston dye his hair darker, and then he gets it bleached to return to an approximation of his natural hair colour.)

the worst because Loki is the god of the outcast and the king of the underdog. this requires more explaining, but he is a jotunn and only welcome in Asgard because he is blood brother to Odin and because he’s useful. when the harm he does to Asgard outweighs his usefulness, he gets chucked under a serpent to suffer pain and agony for his crimes.

the Christian writers of the 13th century were trying to tie the Aesir with the kings of Scandinavia as people who were mythologised.
so I’m going to accept it as a given that the Aesir (and Vanir to an extent) were the native ‘white’ (or at least not Sami) people even though 
the Viking reach went… a long way.
and 
while the Vikings who live on Greenland wanted nothing to do with the Greenlandic Inuit who lived there (they starved to death rather than talk to them) they took slaves/thralls from a lot of places indicated on the map and then freed them and generally did a lot of trade. (there’s also some interesting meta which I can’t be bothered to dig up at the moment about how the Aesir taking ‘foreign’ wives but not allowing their women to marrying out into Vanir or Jotunn husbands indicates power)

I responded a while ago to a question meant for medievalpoc which would contain, as Wikipedia would put it, 'original research' on the linguistic traces of PoC in Viking culture in which I point out they liked literal names and by-names and that since there was a lot of hair bleaching going on, black might not just refer to their hair colour
then I watched this video on how Vikings saw/described colour and they used blue, or the word that is commonly translated to blue, to describe dark colours such as the skin of those from the Middle East and Africa.

so while a cursory google site search of sacred-texts doesn’t show up blue in relation to giants/jotun (the eddas don’t described much colour aside from eyes, hair and maybe cloak colour) I’m just kind of going :| at the MCU’s blue jotunn

so it’s the worst because I’m just silently totting up the evidence of myth!Loki likely having black hair and being an outsider to a white-Scandinavian group who regularly took slaves and prisoners from outside that group and coming up with not white, not Scandinavian, not the pale-skinned redhead he’s commonly depicted as

Tagged: I am not going to tag thisit's bad enough that this might show up in searchI mean I kind of like pale-skinned Loki just so that Hel's 'half white half black' refers to her heritage rather than being metaphorfor how she's half dead (which btw MOST DISTURBING ETYMOLOGICAL CONNECTION)but 'god of the outcast king of the underdog' Loki being those who are outcast and downtrodden is so goodnow organising tags because I'll want to find this laterLokimythologyhistorical context is bestthis is what watching Time Team does to you

16th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Seanan's Tumblr with 841 notes

lunaloxar:

As promised here are some more pics from my finished Persephone Cosplay.

It was just such a nice day with all the other gods. And I have to mention that I had a really great great Hades! It was his first time cosplaying, but he did very well!
I also love my whole group. I never thought that we would actually be so many gods!! We want to wear it again next year and therefore other people will be joining us. Right now we are over 30 people *_*
Can’t wait for it to wear it again. (Just need to fix some things)

The photos are taken by different photographers. Please check them out on Facebook and (if you have an account) on animexx :D


https://www.facebook.com/SilavonDerFotograf

https://www.facebook.com/StephanLausitz

http://animexx.onlinewelten.com/fotos/mitglied/566182/
https://www.facebook.com/AiluropodaMelanoleucaPhotography

http://animexx.onlinewelten.com/fotos/mitglied/253167/

Tagged: cosplaymythology

Source: lunaloxar

12th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Seanan's Tumblr with 8,795 notes

gaelickitsune:

HeyO! This was a bit of something I’ve wanted to do for awhile. Had it in my mind to do an Irish/Celtic/Gaelic/Welsh/Scottishwhathaveyou guide for awhile. Finally got around to it, at the very tail end of summer. So here goes.
Aos Sí: Irish term meaning “people of the mound”, they’re comparatively your faeries and elves of Irish mythology. Some believe they are the living survivors of the Tuatha Dé Danann. They’re fiercely territorial of their little mound homes and can either be really, really pretty or really, really ugly. They’re often referred to not by name, but as “Fair Folk” or “Good Neighbors”. Never, ever piss them off.
Cat Sidhe: Cat Sidhe are faerie cats, often black with white spots on their chests. They haunted Scotland, but a few Irish tales tell of witches who could turn into these cats a total of nine times (nine lives?). The Cat Sidhe were large as dogs and were believed to be able to steal souls by passing over a dead body before burial. Irusan was a cat sidhe the size of an ox, and once took a satirical poet for a wild ride before Saint Ciaran killed it with a hot poker.
Badb: Part of the trio of war goddesses called Morrígna with sisters Macha and Morrígan, Badb, meaning “crow”, was responsible for cleaning bodies up after battle. Her appearance meant imminent bloodshed, death of an important person, and/or mass confusion in soldiers that she would use to turn victories in her favor. She and her sisters fought the Battles of Mag Tuired, driving away the Fir Bolg army and the Formorians. In short: total badass.
Merrow: The Irish mermaid. They were said to be very benevolent, charming, modest and affectionate, capable of attachment and companionship with humans. It is believed that they wore caps or capes that would allow them to live underwater, and taking a cap/cape of a merrow would render them unable to return to the sea. Merrow, unlike regular mermaids, were also capable of “shedding” their skin to become more beautiful beings. They also like to sing.
Púca: Also called a phooka, these are the chaotic neutral creatures of the Irish mythos world. They were known to rot fruit and also offer great advice. They are primarily shapeshifters, taking a variety of forms both scary as heck and really really pretty. The forms they took are always said to be dark in color. Púcas are partial to equine forms and have known to entice riders onto its back for a wild but friendly romp, unlike the Kelpie, which just eats its riders after drowning them.
Faoladh: My all-time favorite Irish creature. Faoladh are Irish werewolves. Unlike their english neighbors, Faoladh weren’t seen as cursed and could change into wolves at will. Faoladh of Ossory (Kilkenny) were known to operate in male/female pairs and would spend several years in wolf form before returning to human life together, replaced in work by a younger couple. They are the guardians and protectors of children, wounded men, and lost people. They weren’t above killing sheep or cattle while in wolf form for a meal, and the evidence remained quite plainly on them in human form. Later on, the story of an Irish King being cursed by God made the Faoladh a little less reputable.
Dullahan: Dullahan are headless riders, often carrying their decapitated cranium beneath one arm. They are said to have wild eyes and a grin that goes from ear to ear, and they use the spine of a human skeleton as a whip (What the WHAT). Their carriages were made of dismembered body parts and general darkness. Where they stop riding is where a person is doomed to die, and when they say the human’s name, that person dies instantly.
Gancanagh: An Irish male faerie known as the “Love-Talker”. He’s a dirty little devil related to the Leprechaun that likes seducing human women. Apparently the sex was great, but ultimately the woman would fall into some sort of ruin, whether it be financial or scandal or generally having their lives turn out awful. He was always carrying a dudeen—Irish pipe—and was a pretty chill guy personality-wise. You just don’t ever want to meet him—it’s really bad luck. 

gaelickitsune:

HeyO! This was a bit of something I’ve wanted to do for awhile. Had it in my mind to do an Irish/Celtic/Gaelic/Welsh/Scottishwhathaveyou guide for awhile. Finally got around to it, at the very tail end of summer. So here goes.

Aos Sí: Irish term meaning “people of the mound”, they’re comparatively your faeries and elves of Irish mythology. Some believe they are the living survivors of the Tuatha Dé Danann. They’re fiercely territorial of their little mound homes and can either be really, really pretty or really, really ugly. They’re often referred to not by name, but as “Fair Folk” or “Good Neighbors”. Never, ever piss them off.

Cat Sidhe: Cat Sidhe are faerie cats, often black with white spots on their chests. They haunted Scotland, but a few Irish tales tell of witches who could turn into these cats a total of nine times (nine lives?). The Cat Sidhe were large as dogs and were believed to be able to steal souls by passing over a dead body before burial. Irusan was a cat sidhe the size of an ox, and once took a satirical poet for a wild ride before Saint Ciaran killed it with a hot poker.

Badb: Part of the trio of war goddesses called Morrígna with sisters Macha and Morrígan, Badb, meaning “crow”, was responsible for cleaning bodies up after battle. Her appearance meant imminent bloodshed, death of an important person, and/or mass confusion in soldiers that she would use to turn victories in her favor. She and her sisters fought the Battles of Mag Tuired, driving away the Fir Bolg army and the Formorians. In short: total badass.

Merrow: The Irish mermaid. They were said to be very benevolent, charming, modest and affectionate, capable of attachment and companionship with humans. It is believed that they wore caps or capes that would allow them to live underwater, and taking a cap/cape of a merrow would render them unable to return to the sea. Merrow, unlike regular mermaids, were also capable of “shedding” their skin to become more beautiful beings. They also like to sing.

Púca: Also called a phooka, these are the chaotic neutral creatures of the Irish mythos world. They were known to rot fruit and also offer great advice. They are primarily shapeshifters, taking a variety of forms both scary as heck and really really pretty. The forms they took are always said to be dark in color. Púcas are partial to equine forms and have known to entice riders onto its back for a wild but friendly romp, unlike the Kelpie, which just eats its riders after drowning them.

Faoladh: My all-time favorite Irish creature. Faoladh are Irish werewolves. Unlike their english neighbors, Faoladh weren’t seen as cursed and could change into wolves at will. Faoladh of Ossory (Kilkenny) were known to operate in male/female pairs and would spend several years in wolf form before returning to human life together, replaced in work by a younger couple. They are the guardians and protectors of children, wounded men, and lost people. They weren’t above killing sheep or cattle while in wolf form for a meal, and the evidence remained quite plainly on them in human form. Later on, the story of an Irish King being cursed by God made the Faoladh a little less reputable.

Dullahan: Dullahan are headless riders, often carrying their decapitated cranium beneath one arm. They are said to have wild eyes and a grin that goes from ear to ear, and they use the spine of a human skeleton as a whip (What the WHAT). Their carriages were made of dismembered body parts and general darkness. Where they stop riding is where a person is doomed to die, and when they say the human’s name, that person dies instantly.

Gancanagh: An Irish male faerie known as the “Love-Talker”. He’s a dirty little devil related to the Leprechaun that likes seducing human women. Apparently the sex was great, but ultimately the woman would fall into some sort of ruin, whether it be financial or scandal or generally having their lives turn out awful. He was always carrying a dudeen—Irish pipe—and was a pretty chill guy personality-wise. You just don’t ever want to meet him—it’s really bad luck. 

Tagged: mythology

Source: gaelickitsune

8th September 2014

Post reblogged from other than that im toters perf with 39 notes

youcantcancelquidditch:

so in sir gawain and the green knight there’s this bit where he plays a game with the king in which they agree to trade each other all of the “prizes” they’ve won throughout the day when they see each other at night, and the king spends all day hunting and brings home beautiful deer and giant boars while gawain spends all day smooching ladies around the castle and when the king gets back from hunting he gives gawain whatever he and his men caught that day and then gawain gives him all of the kisses he received that day. like. the king goes out every morning and hunts really impressive animals and brings them home and trades them for gawain’s kisses. that’s for real the plot of this story. from the 14th century. that was 700 years ago. where the hell are my sir gawain and the green knight aus, people

Tagged: mythologyCute~AUs

Source: youcantcancelquidditch

7th September 2014

Photo reblogged from of angels that make so bold with 20,499 notes

anotheranonymoussoul:

The fall of Icarus by René Milot

anotheranonymoussoul:

The fall of Icarus by René Milot

Tagged: illustration illuminationmythology

Source: pinterest.com

7th September 2014

Post reblogged from In Northern Winter with 16 notes

northernnwinter:

jurakan:

So apparently when he was an angsty teenager C.S. Lewis wrote a story titled ‘Loki Bound’ in which Loki was upset at Odin for making the world and Thor was the antagonist.

I… really want this story now.

http://books.google.com/books?id=wz_TmAx_ikwC&pg=PA40&lpg=PA40&dq=cs+lewis+loki+bound&source=bl&ots=saPlqQA-Cf&sig=0lbOMPAyX2BdqCc0wtGZTWTqkJk&hl=en&sa=X&ei=zKMDVNylIMeqggSCnIG4Cw&ved=0CDcQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=cs%20lewis%20loki%20bound&f=false

Have fun.

Tagged: mythologyLokiC.S. Lewismy secularity is showing

Source: jurakan

6th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from I did it all for you with 69,002 notes

Lil Egyptian Gods by Silverfox5213

Tagged: chibiMythology

Source: lylaha

3rd September 2014

Photo reblogged from woe is to be a shipper with 147 notes

gabbiki:


"Psyche one night was ready for murder, but when she enlightened the face of her beast-husband she saw the beautiful god Eros."

( Animated version of this )

gabbiki:

"Psyche one night was ready for murder, but when she enlightened the face of her beast-husband she saw the beautiful god Eros."

( Animated version of this )

Tagged: where we lay our scene; from ancient grudge break to new mutinyillustration illuminationmythology

3rd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from This is not a blog. No, seriously. with 94,913 notes

sosuperawesome:

Scarves by Shovava

Tagged: owlsfashionwantmythology

Source: sosuperawesome

1st September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Kuckenburg Illustration with 127 notes

kuckenburg:

Naglfar, the nordic ship of the dead - the story to it is quite interesting and you can find a lot about it on the internet.

This was part of my intermediate examintation in March, 2014 and was done in Photoshop (A2).

In the norse mythology the ship is supposed to be made entirely out of finger- and toenails of the deceased. That is why there was the old custom of cutting the nails from the dead, so they could not be used to finish the ship and Ragnarok would not come that soon.

The head of the ship is suposed to picture Hræsvelgr, a giant with the figure of an huge eagle. In old norse his name means “Corpse Swallower”. When he uses his wings, he creates the wind that blows over the lands.  I kind of imagined his body to be the ship (the swallowed and trapped corpses trying to free themselfs) and his wings to be the sails.

Although corpses, bones and kind of root-snake-things are displayed, I still imagine it being made of toenails. I think about it a bit like a makabre skulpture.—

One funny fact about this picture: One of the friendly undead in this ship just always makes me think of The Cat from Kiss. I mean, this is a serious ship of the dead that is part of Ragnarök, and all I see is funny painted men with whiskers.

Tagged: illustration illuminationmythologya little morbid