things I giggle about, love and enjoy.

11th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from a cost-effective alternative to reality with 6,035 notes

kemendraugh:

This is my little brother, reading my Hawkeye issue #19. He is hearing impaired and is currently using/learning sign language as his primary means of communication. He spent his entire lunchtime pouring over this comic, so excited about his language being in one of my books! And a superhero book!

mattfractionblog, thank you for this. 

(We have the entire Signing Time series too, and our lives would be poorer without it! Such a blessing.)

Tagged: awwwcomicsequality & stufflanguages I can't speak

Source: kemendraugh

6th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from a winter-frozen bee with 19,146 notes

coolschmoolzines:

Hawkeye #19 was well worth the wait. I thought nothing would ever top Pizza Dog.

#19 is mostly in sign language with very little subtitles showing just how awesome the medium of comics can be.

Tagged: Marvel comicslanguages I can't speakdoctorhowmanysince you care about these things

Source: coolschmoolzines

27th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from A Little Slice of Regularly Updated Heaven with 97,402 notes

Tagged: cute~wordslanguages I can't speak

Source: kyuketsuki-no-yume

27th July 2014

Photoset reblogged from a cost-effective alternative to reality with 12,228 notes

ohgress:

I can freshen up your german for you, süsse Sebchen…

Tagged: reblogging purely because*whispers*Romania was under Soviet control before the USSR was dissolvedand you know how people joke how Marvel casts actors who are perfectly suited to their roles?well here you go.famous people whose names I don't knowlanguages I can't speak

Source: melswilliams

24th July 2014

Post reblogged from Peter Morwood with 71,061 notes

Optime!

grizzlyhills:

flightcub:

interretialia:

life-of-a-latin-student:

ratwithoutwings:

i’m so upset

I just realized that the reason ghosts say Boo! is because it’s a latin verb

they’re literally saying ‘I alarm/I am alarming/I do alarm!!

I can’t

present active boōpresent infinitive boāreperfect active boāvīsupine boātum

Recte!

image

if it comes from the latin word, they’re actually saying “I’M YELLING!” which is even cuter

do they speak latin because it’s a dead language

Tagged: languages I can't speakawwwit got better!

Source: pidgeling

6th July 2014

Post reblogged from This is not a blog. No, seriously. with 11,639 notes

adogadogonedog:

kimerakincaid:

the asl sign for “transgender" is basically the same as the sign for "beautiful" but signed at the chest instead of in front of the face.

so that’s cool.

this is my imperfect not-a-fluent-signer understanding but:

(based on a presentation by a deaf trans guy i was at in 2005 where he was promoting that sign)

it seems like that sign was invented and implemented by trans people over the last 10-ish years. before that the predominant vocabulary was “sex change” and then some deaf trans people were like “yo fuck that” and came up with the current sign, which starts off with the sign for “myself,” then motion that indicates both change and coming together, and ends with the closed hand held against the sternum.

and in the process it also mimics the sign for “beautiful”

and because of spatial grammar, things closer to the front of your body in ASL are generally more vital, more emphatic, more immediate, more present.

so it’s actually a case where the word coherently indicates “beauty” and “self transformation” and contains hints of the complete thought of “my self transforming, through a coming together of disparate factors, into something more real, immediate, and vital than I was before.”

so yeah. that’s just fuckin’ awesome.

and that’s just the way to express that concept now.

Tagged: languages I can't speakfor all genderswords

Source: kimerakincaid

27th June 2014

Photoset reblogged from I did it all for you with 2,573 notes

nothingbutthedreams:

spindletrees:

the Irish language has no word for ‘have’.

We do, however, have these.

I’m guessing ‘frequented by swans’ is a bad thing. It seems like it should be.

Tagged: wordslanguages I can't speak

Source: spindletrees

18th June 2014

Photo reblogged from The Musika Box with 109,505 notes

haveyoubeentobahia:

theparadoxmachine:

alanahikarichan:

hideousblob:

mostlycatsmostly:

Raising Kittens
(via Valerija S. Vlasov)

dsfklsajflsjfdlk that’s the german word for kittens?
katzenkinder?
literally: “cat children”
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ;w;

ISN’T GERMAN A CUTE LANGUAGEDO YOU KNOW THE GERMAN WORD FOR BATIT’S FLEDERMAUSFLUTTER-MOUSEHOW IS THAT NOT JUST KAWAII AS HECK

My favorite is their word for bagpipes.
DUDELSACK
doodle sack
seriously
But then their word for skull is Totenkopf, as in Death’s Head. 
So German basically has two settings, kawaii and metal, and there is no in between. 
I love German.


and don’t forget mannschaft

haveyoubeentobahia:

theparadoxmachine:

alanahikarichan:

hideousblob:

mostlycatsmostly:

Raising Kittens

(via Valerija S. Vlasov)

dsfklsajflsjfdlk that’s the german word for kittens?

katzenkinder?

literally: “cat children”

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa ;w;

ISN’T GERMAN A CUTE LANGUAGE

DO YOU KNOW THE GERMAN WORD FOR BAT

IT’S FLEDERMAUS

FLUTTER-MOUSE

HOW IS THAT NOT JUST KAWAII AS HECK

My favorite is their word for bagpipes.

DUDELSACK

doodle sack

seriously

But then their word for skull is Totenkopf, as in Death’s Head. 

So German basically has two settings, kawaii and metal, and there is no in between. 

I love German.

and don’t forget mannschaft

Tagged: wordslanguages I can't speakcats

Source: redbubble.com

16th June 2014

Question reblogged from I'm reasonably sure Einstein was a dentist with 3 notes

stargazer93 said: mahi means fish in Farsi lol

doctorhowmany:

oh my gosh that is the best thing. so mahi-mahi was named from freaking hawaiian using a word that also describes it in a totally unrelated language

this is awesome.

it’s a fucking fish-fish.

Tagged: wordslanguages I can't speak

10th June 2014

Photoset reblogged from Diane Duane with 16,252 notes

germannn:

Funny and bizarre German animal names
The German language is famous for some really long nouns (Donaudampfschiffahrtsgesellschaftskapitän comes to mind). This is because German nouns, verbs, prepositions and adjectives are like lego bricks; you can stick them together in almost any way to create new words that encapsulate new concepts. This gives the language a special ability to name just about anything. You could call it the German language’s lego brick-like quality, or Legosteineigenschaft (see what I just did there?).

But why does German rely on such an elaborate process to name things as simple as squirrels? When broken down into their separate components, the names of familiar animals mutate into bizarre new creatures.

The Uncanny X-Tiere

Comics are full of heroes with names like super, wonder, iron, ultra, bat or cat followed by -man, -woman, -girl or -boy. A lot of German animal names work the same way, where Tier – the word for animal – is preceded by a word describing that animal’s “super power”.

  • Stinktier – stink animal (skunk)

  • Faultier – lazy animal (sloth)

  • Gürteltier – belt animal (armadillo)

  • Murmeltier – mumbling animal (groundhog)

  • Schnabeltier – beak animal (platypus)

  • Maultier – mouth animal (mule)

  • Trampeltier – trampling animal (bactrian camel). The verb trampeln means to trample or tread upon, whereas the noun Trampel is a clumsy oaf.

Sometimes suffixes get more specific than -tier, but still tend to describe the wrong animal:

  • Schildkröte – shield toad (tortoise)

  • Waschbär – wash bear (raccoon)

  • Nacktschnecke – naked snail (slug)

  • Fledermaus – flutter mouse (bat)

  • Seehund – sea dog (seal)

  • Tintenfisch – ink fish (squid)

  • Truthahn – threatening chicken (turkey). Trut is onomatopoeic for the trut-trut-trut cluck of a turkey, but it’s also been hypothesized that the name comes from the Middle German droten which means “to threaten”.

No, I’m Pretty Sure That’s A Pig

Swine seem to be a popular yardstick in German animal taxonomy.

  • Schweinswal – pig whale (porpoise)

  • Seeschwein – sea pig (dugong). Not to be confused with the Seekuh, or sea cow, known in English as a manatee.

  • Stachelschwein – spike pig (porcupine). The English word is actually just as literal; porcupine sounds a lot like “pork spine”.

  • Wasserschwein – water pig (capybara)

  • Meerschweinchen – ocean piglet (guinea pig). The ending -chen denotes something small. Add it to the end of Schwein and you get a little pig, or piglet. Since the stems Meer and Wasser are often interchangeable, it’s most likely that Meerschweinchen actually means little capybara.

Just Plain Weird

I’d like to end this list by giving one animal a category all to itself: the humble squirrel.

Eichhörnchen:

  • little oak horn: Eiche (oak tree) + Horn (horn) + -chen (little)
  • oak croissant: Eiche (oak tree) + Hörnchen (croissant)

alternate names:

  • Eichkätzchen (regional name) and Eichkatzerl (Austria) – oak kitten

Calling a squirrel a “tree kitten” is reasonably literal, but where does “little oak horn” come from? It seems that the answer comes down to a misplaced h: Eichhörnchen comes from the Old and Middle German eichorn, which has nothing to do with oak trees or horns. In this case, the eich comes from the ancient Indo-Germanic word aig, which means agitated movement, combined with the now obsolete suffix -orn. Somewhere in history a superfluous h was added (along with the diminutive -chen ending) but the original meaning remained. Today, Hörnchen is a category of rodents that includes all squirrels, chipmunks, groundhogs, prairie dogs and flying squirrels.

Keep an eye on this spot for an upcoming post where we’ll delve deeper into the animal kingdom: branching out to birds, insects, reptiles, fishes and any other mammals we find crawling around.

Tagged: languages I can't speakwords

Source: germannn