things I giggle about, love and enjoy.

14th April 2014

Photo reblogged from a winter-frozen bee with 217,722 notes

idratherdreamofjune:

softdespair:

join-they-said:

Russian medical record written in cursive

you say russian and i raise you chinese


*gasp of horror*

idratherdreamofjune:

softdespair:

join-they-said:

Russian medical record written in cursive

you say russian and i raise you chinese

Chinese doctors' handwriting

*gasp of horror*

Tagged: languages I can't speakRussian jokes

Source: join-they-said

17th March 2014

Quote reblogged from a winter-frozen bee with 439 notes

World War II records and anecdotal evidence show that many people from southern Louisiana were sent to France to serve as interpreters for other Americans. It is hard to underestimate the effect this had on many Cajuns, because this was the period in which the Louisiana public school system was attempting to eradicate the use of French among school-children, and the word Cajun came to be used by many as a synonym for backwards, illiterate swamp dwellers. Yet these southern Louisiana men were sent to France because they were fluent in a language that could keep other soldiers alive and forge bonds with members of another country. Thus, the quality that made them “backwards” in their home state made them ambassadors in the country their ancestors called home.
— J. Daniel D’Oney, “Louisiana’s Old State Capitol Museum,” in Defining Memory, edited by Amy K. Levin (via swanjolras)

Tagged: languages I can't speakhistory is funbut also sadnesscontent warning: wwii and Nazi Germany

Source: historicallyaccuratesteve

11th March 2014

Photoset reblogged from Cygnaut with 694 notes

cygnaut:

Michael & his rusty german. 

#he said something about anne-marie duff telling him not to read too many reviews

Awww!

Tagged: awwwbest friends everfamous people whose names I don't knowactually I'm just lazylanguages I can't speak

Source: fassbendshark

27th February 2014

Video reblogged from The Musika Box with 71,298 notes

a-dreamers-universe:

kimmiehier:

stitchkingdom:

LET IT GO sequence from Frozen in 25 languages

HERE COMES THE LYRICS! DON’T ASK ME HOW TO PRONOUNCE!

The snow glows white on the mountain tonight, not a footprint to be seen.
La royaume de solitude, Ma place est là pour toujours
Der Wind, er heult so wie der Sturm ganz tief in mir. 
Het werd mij te veel, hoe ik mijn best ook deed.

Bié ràng tāmen jìnlái kànjiàn, zuò hǎo nǚhái, jiù xiàng nǎi de cóngqián
Visa ingenting, vad du än gör, allt är förstört

Arinomama no sugata miseru no yo
Libre soy, libre soy, libertad sin vuelta atrás
Wszystkim wbrew na ten gest mnie stać
Jöjjön száz orkán, és közben a szívemen ül a jég

Desde la distancia, qué pequeño todo es
I les pors que em dominaven per sempre han fugit
Non è un difetto, è una virtù e non la fermerò mai più
Naemamdaelo jayulobge sallae

Sad je kraj, sad je kraj Na krilima vetra sam
Sui yik yui chuen sam gong Mong diu jau tin bei gong
Estou aqui, e vou ficar! Venha a tempestade

Kuasaku buat hidup bercelaru
Podvlastny mne moroz i lod, nu chto za divnyy dar
Og som krystaller står en tanke ganske klar
Shte spra da bŭda az na minaloto plen

La den gå, la den gå, jeg skal stige lik solen nå
Pl̀xy xxk mā leik s̀xn rên dĕk dī mị̀ h̄ĕn mī kh̀ā 
Je suis là, comme je l’ai rêvé
En de storm raast door, De vrieskou, daar zat ik toch al niet mee

And so the ultimate english Let it go version is…

English: The snow glows white on the mountain tonight, not a footprint to be seen.

French: The kingdom of loneliness, my place will always be here

German: The wind, it howls like the storm deep inside me

Dutch: It became too much for me, no matter how hard I tried

Mandarin: Don’t let them come, (don’t let them) see. Be the good girl, just like how you used to be.

Swedish: Don’t show anything whatever you do… Everything is ruined!

Japanese: The true self, (I will) show (it)

Latin American Spanish: I am free, I am free… freedom without having to return!

Polish: Everyone against, this gesture I can afford (to give)!

Hungarian: Come hundreds of windstorms! And meanwhile my heart is wrapped in ice.

Castilian Spanish: From the distance, how small everything is.

Catalan: and the fears that have dominated me, have gone away forever

Italian: It’s not a defect, it’s a virtue and I’ll never stop it again

Korean: I would live freely, to my heart’s content!

Serbian: Now it ends, now it ends, I’m on the wings of wind

Cantonese: Whoever, regardless, also desires to say with all the heart. Forget the strains of yesterday, the sorrowful songs!

Portoguese: I am here, and I’m staying! Come the storm!

Bahasia Malaysia: My powers make my life chaotic.

Russian: I have power over the frost, ice, what a marvelous gift!

Danish: And like crystals, a thought stands clear.

Bulgarian: I will stop being, a captive to the past!

Norwegian: Let it go, let it go, I will rise like the sun now.

Thai: Let it out, don’t hide! There’s nothing worth about being a good child.

Canadian French: I’m here as I have dreamed of!

Flemish: And the storm rages on! The freezing cold is already there, and I don’t care about it anyway.

Tagged: languages I can't speakmusiceverything is owned by Disney

Source: stitchkingdom

14th February 2014

Video reblogged from Seanan's Tumblr with 8,099 notes

arendellemusic:

Let It Go- American Sign Language

Oh man, this is really mesmerizing and my new favorite version of Let It Go

Tagged: doctorhowmanysince you care about these thingslanguages I can't speakvideomusic

Source: deadrevolutionaries

8th February 2014

Audio post reblogged from The Musika Box with 31,297 notes - Played 209,323 times

bri-ecrit:

starparticles:

I just really, really like the Norwegian version of Let it Go, and I found the dub to be quite good, and really fitting to the actual movie.
SO YES, spreading the love ~ 

I’m a sucker for Disney songs in what would be their canonical languages, so… *presses play*

…hoooooly shit, I’ve listened to “Let It Go” in, like, over a dozen languages at this point but I s2g whoever is singing this is Idina’s Norwegian cousin. o.o

Tagged: musiceverything is owned by Disneyall the dub singers are well matched to Indinalanguages I can't speak

Source: starparticles

1st February 2014

Question reblogged from Cygnaut with 59 notes

ikeracity asked: #and Liebling is one of the most common mistakes#endearments don't work that way in German -- what what??? enlightenment me please, dear widge!!

widgenstain:

issabella:

widgenstain:

Oh dear… I wanted to do a little PSA on that matter a while ago but I came across as a complete snob. Also I’m not a linguist, so it’s pretty hard to explain some of it.

Anyway:

In German we don’t have those affectionate fillers like “darling” or “dear” at the end of a sentence. You use endearments to address someone as in “Schatz, kannst du mir die Tasse holen?” (Darling, could you get me the cup? also notice the lack of please, yes we’re a rude people xD) but that’s mostly it.

If used as a filler it comes across as a bit condescending. More than it does in English. “Das war keine gute Idee mein Liebling.” (that wasn’t a good idea, my darling) And in this case you always use the possessive adjective.

You can use endearments in a plain statement as “Du bist mein Schatz.” (you are my precious) which is ALWAYS wonderful to hear.

The main “problem” with Liebling is though, that it’s a bit dated. Even if the fic takes place in 1962. “Liebchen” is even worse. Far far worse. It’s what a 19th century poet would call a fair, 16-year old female maiden. (I seriously have no clue who fed that data to the dictionaries)

There are of course exceptions (if you congratulate someone f.ex… Oh god this is getting too long) and I can only talk about what sounds wrong to me (and issabella.)

Just in general, don’t substitute the English “my dear” or “darling” with Liebling. And if in doubt, ask a German native. We will always help when it comes to our language :D

#what apropriate names Erik could use for Charles #Suesser? #Schnucki?

*spits out tea* OMG! Schnuckelchen? Hasiputz? Haselschnäuzchen? And with ‘Süsser’ I see Erik as some totally sleezy macho guy with gold chains around his neck, aviator-sunglasses and fake tan. XD (This calls for a very cracky fanfic!)

For the rest - what you said! Well ‘Schatz’ is really the most non-embaressing one I have ever heard used. (I can live with Liebling in fanfic, though Liebchen really makes me feel very uncomfortable and can send me running. Probably because besides being rather dated it has a negative connotation too, like someone you have an affair/fling with, not someone you are in love with.)

Most people will use more or less embaressing animal-names. But lets face it, there are no really ‘good’ endearments in German - in my humble opinion. XD  

HASIPUTZ!!!! That’s it!! From now on Erik will be calling Charles Hasiputz in my fics! AHAHAHAHAHA (don’t)

I always hear Suesser in this reeeeaally camp voice. So yeah, crack fics! xD

Tagged: languages I can't speakI ran a couple through google because I couldn't figure out contextand there was this survey of what Germans called their loved ones'Mausi' came in at 3%so that's me sorted for Erik's nicknames for CharlesSchatz and Süsser can be for Hansel and Gretel if the translation convention of their universe failswords

Source: widgenstain

28th January 2014

Photo reblogged from Peter Morwood with 173 notes

interretialia:

latinone:

Since Andrew was asking about the colours in Latin, here they are.

There are some things that need to be said about the words that appear in that image.  First, these words are used substantively, that is, they are used as nouns.  So, for instance, Flavum above means “the color yellow.”  “Yellow” as an adjective is flavus, flava, flavum.
Also, this chart has some problems.  The Rosum and Orangeum seem to have been made up.  There are much better Latin words for “red” and “orange.”
Red:
ruber, rubra, rubrum [adjective];
rubrum, rubri, n., or rubor, ruboris, m. [noun].
Orange:
aurantius, aurantia, aurantium, or luteus, lutea, luteum [adjective];
aurantium, aurantii, n., or luteum, lutei, n. [noun].
The adjectival forms of the nouns in the image above are:
Yellow: flavus, flava, flavum
Green: viridis, viridis, viride
Blue: caeruleus, caerulea, caeruleum
Purple: purpureus, purpurea, purpureum
Brown: fuscus, fusca, fuscum
Black: niger, nigra, nigrum
White: albus, alba, album
Here are some other useful Latin color adjectives:
Brown: brunneus, brunnea, brunneum
Chartreuse: chlorinus, chlorina, chlorinum
Crimson: coccineus, coccinea, coccineum
Gold: aureus, aurea, aureum
Indigo: indigoticus, indigotica, indigoticum
Lavender: lavandulaceus, lavandulacea, lavandulaceum
Magenta: magenteus, magentea, magenteum
Ochre: silaceus, silacea, silaceum
Pink: roseus, rosea, roseum
Silver: argenteus, argentea, argenteum
Turquoise: turicus, turica, turicum
Violet: violaceus, violacea, violaceum
Finally, here are the names that Newton gave to the seven well-known colors of the rainbow:

Rubeus - Red
Aureus - Orange
Flavus - Yellow
Viridis - Green
Caeruleus - Blue
Indicus - Indigo
Violaceus - Violet

interretialia:

latinone:

Since Andrew was asking about the colours in Latin, here they are.

There are some things that need to be said about the words that appear in that image.  First, these words are used substantively, that is, they are used as nouns.  So, for instance, Flavum above means “the color yellow.”  “Yellow” as an adjective is flavus, flava, flavum.

Also, this chart has some problems.  The Rosum and Orangeum seem to have been made up.  There are much better Latin words for “red” and “orange.”

Red:

  • ruber, rubra, rubrum [adjective];
  • rubrum, rubri, n., or rubor, ruboris, m. [noun].

Orange:

  • aurantius, aurantia, aurantium, or luteus, lutea, luteum [adjective];
  • aurantium, aurantii, n., or luteum, lutei, n. [noun].

The adjectival forms of the nouns in the image above are:

  • Yellow: flavus, flava, flavum
  • Green: viridis, viridis, viride
  • Blue: caeruleus, caerulea, caeruleum
  • Purple: purpureus, purpurea, purpureum
  • Brown: fuscus, fusca, fuscum
  • Black: niger, nigra, nigrum
  • White: albus, alba, album

Here are some other useful Latin color adjectives:

  • Brown: brunneus, brunnea, brunneum
  • Chartreuse: chlorinus, chlorina, chlorinum
  • Crimson: coccineus, coccinea, coccineum
  • Gold: aureus, aurea, aureum
  • Indigo: indigoticus, indigotica, indigoticum
  • Lavender: lavandulaceus, lavandulacea, lavandulaceum
  • Magenta: magenteus, magentea, magenteum
  • Ochre: silaceus, silacea, silaceum
  • Pink: roseus, rosea, roseum
  • Silver: argenteus, argentea, argenteum
  • Turquoise: turicus, turica, turicum
  • Violet: violaceus, violacea, violaceum

Finally, here are the names that Newton gave to the seven well-known colors of the rainbow:

image

  • Rubeus - Red
  • Aureus - Orange
  • Flavus - Yellow
  • Viridis - Green
  • Caeruleus - Blue
  • Indicus - Indigo
  • Violaceus - Violet

Tagged: wordsdefinitionslanguages I can't speakinteresting information

Source: lifeandlatine

27th January 2014

Video reblogged from a winter-frozen bee with 19,876 notes

disneyanimation:

Hear “Let It Go,” the Academy Award nominee for Best Original Song, in 25 different languages and see how fans in other countries have experienced Elsa unleashing her powers.

Tagged: musiclanguages I can't speak

Source: disneyanimation

24th January 2014

Quote reblogged from I did it all for you with 1,948 notes

Some words for hangover, like ours, refer prosaically to the cause: the Egyptians say they are “still drunk,” the Japanese “two days drunk,” the Chinese “drunk overnight.” The Swedes get “smacked from behind.” But it is in languages that describe the effects rather than the cause that we begin to see real poetic power. Salvadorans wake up “made of rubber,” the French with a “wooden mouth” or a “hair ache.” The Germans and the Dutch say they have a “tomcat,” presumably wailing. The Poles, reportedly, experience a “howling of kittens.” My favorites are the Danes, who get “carpenters in the forehead.” In keeping with the saying about the Eskimos’ nine words for snow, the Ukrainians have several words for hangover.

Hangovers, translated, from A Few Too Many

In honor of tonight’s overindulgence and tomorrow’s consequences, one of my favorite New Yorker essays of all time. 

(via pinwheeling)

Tagged: wordsdefinitionslanguages I can't speak

Source: pinwheeling